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University of Newcastle Library guides

APA 7th Style:  Course material

UON Library guide for the APA 7th referencing style

Lectures and course material

General rules:

Author Names
  • The course coordinator is usually the author, unless otherwise noted.
Titles
  • Ttitles appear in full (including any sub-title), and in italics.
  • Capitalise the first words of title and sub-title, along with any proper nouns.
  • Add a description after the title, such as [PowerPoint slides], [Lecture notes].
Publisher
  • Not required for these types of resources.
Access URLs
  • APA 7 does not require the statement "Retrieved from ..." for these types of resources.
  • Include the full access link for the report.
  • Do not include a full-stop after the URL at the end of the reference.

Lecture notes and PowerPoint slides

 

General Notes:

  • The course coordinator is usually the author, unless otherwise noted.

  • Add a description after the title, such as [PowerPoint slides], [Lecture notes].

  • These titles should always be italicised.

  • If you cannot locate a date on the document use the abbreviation (n.d.) in place of the year.

  • You will need to add the name of the Learning Management System (LMS) after the title.  UON uses 'Blackboard'.

  • Use the log-in address from Blackboard (UoNline) for the access link: https://uonline.newcastle.edu.au/

  • Online documents are considered 'static' by APA standards and therefore do not require the words 'Retrieved from' before an access link.  This is a major revision for APA 7. 

  • Do not include a full-stop after the URL at the end of the reference.

  • APA allows for links to be either plain text or 'active'. See the official APA Style Blog for more information.

Course material from UON

PowerPoint, etc., from the web

 

Reference list examples:

 


In-text

Every time you paraphrase, or use an idea from another source you must include an in-text citation to that source.
Follow the general patterns:  (Author Surname, Year)

Example:

Australian education providers will need to address a number of challenges to ensure standards of special education are fully supporting students with special needs and their families (Smith, 2012).

 

Direct Quotations

If you include a direct quote, that is word-for-word from a PowerPoint source, add a slide reference to your in-text citation, e.g.:

“These films absorb, through a collage of images, traces of the Italian inheritance of neo-realist cinema” (Acciari, 2014, Slide 4).

If you include a direct quote, that is word-for-word from lecture notes, add a pagee reference to your in-text citation, e.g.:

“These films absorb, through a collage of images, traces of the Italian inheritance of neo-realist cinema” (Acciari, 2014, p. 4).

Recorded lectures

 

General Notes:

  • The course coordinator is usually the author, unless otherwise noted.

  • Add a description after the title, such as [Lecture recording].

  • These titles should always be italicised.

  • You will need to add the name of the Learning Management System (LMS) after the title.  UON uses 'Blackboard'.

  • Use the log-in address from Blackboard (UoNline) for the access link: https://uonline.newcastle.edu.au/

  • Online recordings of this nature are considered 'static' by APA standards and therefore do not require the words 'Retrieved from' before an access link.  This is a major revision for APA 7. 

  • Do not include a full-stop after the URL at the end of the reference.

  • APA allows for links to be either plain text or 'active'. See the official APA Style Blog for more information.

Lecture recording from UON

 

Reference list examples:

 


In-text

Every time you paraphrase, or use an idea from another source you must include an in-text citation to that source.
Follow the general pattern:  (Author Surname, Year)

Example:

Australian education providers will need to address a number of challenges to ensure standards of special education are fully supporting students with special needs and their families (Smith, 2019).

 

Need to direct quote or paraphrase from a video?

Use a timestamp. Check the time that the quote starts on the video and use that in place of a page number, e.g. (Smith, 2019, 10:19). Here the 10:19 refers to 10 minutes and 19 seconds into the video, where the quote we want starts.

Forum posts

 

General Notes:

  • There may be times when you need to reference forum posts in Blackboard (or elsewhere) written by yourself or others. These forum posts should be referenced appropriately to show your source/s.

  • Add a description after the title, such as [Online forum post].

  • These titles should always be italicised.

  • You will need to add the name of the Learning Management System (LMS) after the title.  UON uses 'Blackboard'.

  • Use the log-in address from Blackboard (UoNline) for the access link: https://uonline.newcastle.edu.au/

  • Online posts do not require the words 'Retrieved from' before an access link.  This is a major revision for APA 7. 

  • Do not include a full-stop after the URL at the end of the reference.

  • APA allows for links to be either plain text or 'active'. See the official APA Style Blog for more information.

Blackboard forum posts

 

Reference list examples:

 


In-text

Every time you paraphrase, or use an idea from another source you must include an in-text citation to that source.
Follow the general patterns:  (Author Surname, Year)

Example:

Australian education providers will need to address a number of challenges to ensure standards of special education are fully supporting students with special needs and their families (Smith, 2012).

 

Direct Quotations

If you include a direct quote, that is word-for-word from a PowerPoint source, add a slide reference to your in-text citation, e.g.:

“These films absorb, through a collage of images, traces of the Italian inheritance of neo-realist cinema” (Acciari, 2014, Slide 4).

If you include a direct quote, that is word-for-word from lecture notes, add a pagee reference to your in-text citation, e.g.:

“These films absorb, through a collage of images, traces of the Italian inheritance of neo-realist cinema” (Acciari, 2014, p. 4).

Course readers and Compiled textbooks ('Custom book editions')

 

Course readers and compiled textbooks (or 'custom book editions') are collections of readings specifically chosen by course coordinators for their subjects. These are specially printed for the course and then made available for sale.

 

How can I tell if I have a course reader or compiled textbook?

Course readers are the more obvious of the two and will include your course code on the cover.

Compiled textbooks will often look more like a standard book from a regular publisher. Look for the wording "custom book" and "University of Newcastle" in prominent locations to identify them. Compiled textbooks will often also have "Compiled by ..." on the book (some may have "Edited by ..." instead).

 

How do I reference from these types of books?

Referencing from one of these books requires that you use the referencing information of the source being reprinted, rather than citing the course reader or compiled textbook.

The required referencing information can usually be found either on the chapter/section or in the front of the compilation. Remember that the referencing style used in the compilation may be different to your required referencing style and that parts of the reference might be missing.

Once you have checked what type of resource has been reprinted (e.g. article, chapter from an edited book, etc.), refer to the appropriate pages on this guide.

N.B.: Be careful to quote the page numbers from the original source, not the running page numbers from the compilation. Usually the compilation numbers are easy to differentiate as they are in a banner along the top or bottom of the page.

 

Example compiled textbook

The compiled textbook in-hand is 'Managing Under Uncertainty'. It is made up of chapters reprinted from other books.

APA says to reference the original content being reprinted, not the compiled textbook - so reference the chapter from its original source, not from 'Managing Under Uncertainty'.

As an example, Chapter 2 shows that it was reprinted from 'Management: A Focus on Leaders' by A. McKee, so we would reference the chapter as if the information came from the original book by McKee.

Note that in these compilations some chapters may be from books (where the authors have written the whole thing), while others may be chapters from edited books (where each chapter has different authors) - you will need to confirm this for the correct referencing. The information for journal articles will usually be clearer.

 


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UON Referencing Guide