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University of Newcastle Library guides

APA 7th Style:  Book chapters

UON Library guide for the APA 7th referencing style

Book chapters

A note on citing chapters versus citing entire books:

 

Where the chapter you want to use has distinct authors, then cite the chapter following the directions on this page. You can cite multiple chapters from these types of books as separate entries in your reference list.

Where the same author/s wrote the entire book (i.e. authors aren't listed for the individual chapters), then you should cite the entire book, not the chapter/s.

General rules:

Author Names
  • Appear first in the reference, surname first followed by a comma, then initials (do not include the full first names of authors).
  • Include all author names in the reference list.
  • If the book does not have an author move the title to the author position, before the year of publication. End with a full-stop.
  • If the book is edited, place the editor names in the author position. After the last editor include the abbreviation (Ed.) or (Eds.), then a full-stop.
Chapter titles
  • The title of the chapter appears after the year of publication.
  • Capitalise the first words of title and sub-title, along with any proper nouns.
Editor Names
  • All editors names must be included (initials first then surnames). The abbreviation (Ed.), or (Eds.) is included after the last editor.
  • For substantial works with a large editorial board, naming the lead editor followed by et al. is acceptable.
Book Titles
  • Book titles appear in full (including any sub-title), and in italics.
  • Capitalise the first words of title and sub-title, along with any proper nouns.
Editions
  • Include details of the edition in brackets after the title (not in italics), followed by a full-stop.
  • Editions should only be noted if 2nd ed. or above, if a special 1st edition (e.g. 1st Aust. ed.), or if the book has been otherwise updated or revised (e.g. Rev. ed., Updated 8th ed., etc). APA does not require a standard 1st ed. to be documented.
  • Remove any superscript from editions when typing - all letters should be on the same line (e.g. 2nd ed.).
Page numbers
  • Page numbers for the chapter are included in brackets after the book title after pp., e.g. (pp. 12-20).
  • If there is an edition statement, page numbers should be included in the same brackets, after the edition, e.g. (3rd ed., pp. 158-170).
Place of Publication
  • No longer required.  This is a major revision for APA 7.
Publisher
  • Publisher information is now required for all books, regardless of formatThis is a major revision for APA 7.
  • Do not include business structure terms such as "LLC", "Inc", or "Ltd" in the publisher name.
  • Where multiple publishers are noted, add them in order, separated by a semicolon (e.g. American Heart Association; Wiley & Sons.)
  • Where the author and the publisher are the same, leave out the publisher information to avoid repetition.
Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs)
  • If a resource is assigned a DOI, this alphanumeric sequence is required to be added to the reference. Check the What are DOIs? page for more information.

  • For formatting purposes, DOIs must be formatted in APA 7 references as the link version, e.g. "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2004.03.029".

  • Do not include a full-stop after the DOI at the end of the reference.

Access URLs
  • If accessing an ebook from the Library catalogue or a database, no access link is required.  This is a major revision for APA 7.
  • APA 7 does not require the statement "Retrieved from ..." for ebooks.
  • If the ebook was found via the web (and no log-in is required), include the full access link.
  • Do not include a full-stop after the URL at the end of the reference.

References within books and chapters

 

In your research you will often encounter articles that refer to another researcher's work. This source within a source is known as a 'secondary source' and is referenced in a particular way.

Where possible, you should try to obtain the original work being referenced and read through the research to form your own opinions.

Often, however, it is impossible to obtain the original publication - it may be published in another language, or in a book or journal which is difficult to access.

In these circumstances, you are permitted to include a citation to the secondary source.

For more information on how to reference these resources see the page on Secondary sources.

Book chapters with 1 author

 

Chapter with a DOI (print or electronic)

Chapter from a library database (with no DOI)

Chapter found on the web (with no DOI)

Print chapter (with no DOI)

For multiple editors use (Eds.).  2 editors would be formatted as A. Smith & B. Jones (Eds.) with no comma between the editor names. For 3 or more editors, add a comma between them, e.g. A. Smith, B. Jones, & C. Black (Eds.)

 

Reference list examples:


In-text

Every time you paraphrase, or use an idea from another source you must include an in-text citation to that source.
This is the general format for a source that has 1 author:  (Author Surname, Year)

Example:

Australian education providers will need to address a number of challenges to ensure standards of special education are fully supporting students with special needs and their families (Dempsey, 2012).

 

Direct Quotations

If you include a direct quote, that is word-for-word from a source which has 1 author, the general format of the in-text citation appears:  (Author Surname, Year, p. X)

“These films absorb, through a collage of images, traces of the Italian inheritance of neo-realist cinema” (Acciari, 2014, p. 14).

NOTE: Use "p" when quoting from one page - for example (Acciari, 2014, p. 14), and "pp" when quoting from more than one page - for example (Wessel, 2015, pp. 53-54).

Book chapters with 2 authors

 

Chapter with a DOI (print or electronic)

Chapter from a library database (with no DOI)

Chapter found on the web (with no DOI)

Print chapter (with no DOI)

For multiple editors use (Eds.).  2 editors would be formatted as A. Smith & B. Jones (Eds.) with no comma between the editor names. For 3 or more editors, add a comma between them, e.g. A. Smith, B. Jones, & C. Black (Eds.)

 

Reference list examples:


In-text

Every time you paraphrase, or use an idea from another source you must include an in-text citation to that source.
This is the general format for a source that has 2 authors:  (1st Author surname & 2nd Author surname, Year)

Example:

New technologies need to be evaluated before large scale investment is made by organisations (Marra & Edmond, 2014).

 

Direct Quotations

If you include a direct quote, that is word-for-word from a source which has 1 author, the general format of the in-text citation appears:  (1st Author surname & 2nd Author surname, Year, p. X)

"The convergence of media means that the dichotomy between old and new media economies is hard to maintain" (Gorton & Garde-Hansen, 2013, p. 298).

NOTE: Use "p" when quoting from one page - for example (Smith & Jones, 2019, p. 14), and "pp" when quoting from more than one page - for example (Smith & Jones, 2019, pp. 14-15).

Book chapters with 3 or more authors

 

Chapter with a DOI (print or electronic)

Chapter from a library database (with no DOI)

Chapter found on the web (with no DOI)

Print chapter (with no DOI)

Continue the above patterns, adding additional authors as needed.

For multiple editors use (Eds.).  2 editors would be formatted as A. Smith & B. Jones (Eds.) with no comma between the editor names. For 3 or more editors, add a comma between them, e.g. A. Smith, B. Jones, & C. Black (Eds.)

 

Reference list examples:


In-text

Every time you paraphrase, or use an idea from another source you must include an in-text citation to that source.
This is the general format for a source that has 3 or more authors:  (1st Author surname et al., Year)

Example:

... techniques including visual observations during ambulation on a flat surface (McDonald et al., 2006).

 

Direct Quotations

If you include a direct quote, that is word-for-word from a source which has 3 or more authors, the general format of the in-text citation appears:  (1st Author surname et al., Year, p. X)

Jorm et al. (2006, p. 4) argue "the key areas for action are prevention and early intervention with first-onset disorders".

NOTE: Use "p" when quoting from one page - for example (Smith et al., 2019, p. 14), and "pp" when quoting from more than one page - for example (Smith et al., 2019, pp. 14-15).

Chapters from books with a large number of authors listed (instead of editors)

 

General notes:
  • There has been an increase recently in publications (especially Australasian editions) where multiple authors are listed on the cover that are not editors, with each chapter having distinct authors listed.
  • Note that if the same author/s wrote the whole book (i.e. authors aren't listed for the individual chapters), then you should cite the book, not the chapter/s.

A few examples of popular titles that fall into the authors-not-editors category are listed below:

  • Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing [3 vol. set]  [catalogue link]
  • LeMone and Burke's Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking for Person-Centred Care [3 vol. set]  [catalogue link]
  • Skills in Clinical Nursing  [catalogue link]
  • Education, Change and Society  [catalogue link]

The Library has consulted with APA experts and recommends the following patterns, based on the template for chapters from edited books:

Chapter with a DOI (print or electronic)

Chapter from a library database (with no DOI)

Chapter found on the web (with no DOI)

Print chapter (with no DOI)

Volumes can be added to the brackets after the edition and before the pages (see the examples below)

 

Reference list examples:


In-text

Every time you paraphrase, or use an idea from another source you must include an in-text citation to that source.

The in-text citations for the above would only include the chapter author/s. As an example, the in-text citation for the chapter from Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing would be (Hales, 2018).

For these chapters, follow the author formatting for the number of authors involved.

 

Direct Quotations

 

If you include a direct quote, that is word-for-word from a source, add pagination to your in-text citation:

“These films absorb, through a collage of images, traces of the Italian inheritance of neo-realist cinema” (Acciari, 2014, p. 14).

NOTE: Use "p" when quoting from one page - for example (Acciari, 2014, p. 14), and "pp" when quoting from more than one page - for example (Wessel, 2015, pp. 53-54).

Entries from reference works

 

General notes:
  • Reference works include dictionaries, encyclopaedias, thesaurii, handbooks, indexes, etc.
  • For health-related reference works such as AMH, MIMS, BMJ Best Practice, UpToDate, etc, see this specialist page.
  • For 'Research Starters' from the Library catalogue (NewCat+), see the next tab on this page.

Individual author:

Entry with a DOI (print or electronic)

Entry from a library database (with no DOI)

Entry found on the web (with no DOI)

Entry from print work (with no DOI)

No author?

Follow the patterns above, but move the 'Title of entry' to the author position in front of the year.  See the 'Bespoke' and 'Prevalence' reference list examples below.

For multiple editors use (Eds.).  See the other tabs for how to format multiple editors.

Corporate author:

Entry with a DOI (print or electronic)

Entry from a library database (with no DOI)

Entry found on the web (with no DOI)

Entry from print work (with no DOI)

 

Reference list examples:


In-text

Every time you paraphrase, or use an idea from another source you must include an in-text citation to that source.
For reference entries, follow the author formatting for the number and type of authors involved.

For entries with no author, use the title in double quotes with the year, e.g. ("Bespoke," 2009) or ("Prevalence," 2020)

 

Direct Quotations

If you include a direct quote, that is word-for-word from a source, add pagination to your in-text citation.

Use "p" when quoting from one page and "pp" when quoting from more than one page.

'Research Starters' from the Library catalogue

 
General notes:
  • Short 'articles' called 'Research Starters' can often be found in the Library catalogue (NewCat+) when searching for certain topics. If you use information from one of these Reference Starters, it should be referenced as you would any other source in your assignment.
  • These are usually taken from sources such as encyclopaedias or other reference works. Therefore, the reference list entry would follow the same basic pattern.
  • Be sure to check with your lecturer if these kinds of resources are suitable for use in your assignments.

As Research Starters come from the Library catalogue, they are formatted as:

Research Starter

 

An example from a search results screen is shown below:

The source for the information will be included in the resource:

As we accessed the Research Starter from the Library catalogue, we do not need to add a link.

 

So for this resource the reference list entry would look like:

 

The in-text citation would then be:  (Vallente, 2018)

As Research Starters do not include page numbers, if you wished to include a direct quote you could count the paragraphs (common practice for web resources), for example:

According to Vallente (2018), clinical reasoning is "the application of critical thinking at the point of care" (para. 4).

Short stories in collections

 

For collections with an editor:

Story with a DOI (print or electronic)

Story from a library database (with no DOI)

Story from collection on the web (with no DOI)

Story from a print collection (with no DOI)

For multiple editors use (Eds.).  See the other tabs for how to format multiple editors.

For collections without an editor:

Story with a DOI (print or electronic)

Story from a library database (with no DOI)

Story from collection on the web (with no DOI)

Story from a print collection (with no DOI)

 

Reference list examples:


In-text

Every time you paraphrase, or use an idea from another source you must include an in-text citation to that source.
This is the general format for a source that has 1 author:  (Author Surname, Year)

Example:

Australian education providers will need to address a number of challenges to ensure standards of special education are fully supporting students with special needs and their families (Dempsey, 2012).

 

Direct Quotations

If you include a direct quote, that is word-for-word from a source which has 1 author, the general format of the in-text citation appears:  (Author Surname, Year, p. X)

“These films absorb, through a collage of images, traces of the Italian inheritance of neo-realist cinema” (Acciari, 2014, p. 14).

NOTE: Use "p" when quoting from one page - for example (Acciari, 2014, p. 14), and "pp" when quoting from more than one page - for example (Wessel, 2015, pp. 53-54).

Poems, epigrams and epigraphs

 

For the above short pieces, refer to the Other resources page.

Course Readers and Compiled Texts ('Custom Book Editions')

 

Course readers and compiled texts are usually collections of chapters and articles specifically chosen as readings for a particular subject.

To reference from these publications see the notes on the Course Material page.


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UON Referencing Guide