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University of Newcastle Library guides

APA 7th Style:  Images, art, tables

UON Library guide for the APA 7th referencing style

Referencing image and art sources

 

APA uses the terminology 'figures' when discussing image sources. 'Figures' includes the following image types:

  • Graphs
  • Charts
  • Maps (included in sources, not the standalone type)
  • Drawings / illustrations
  • Photographs

Note that tables are a separate designation with differing rules. See the Tables tabs for more information.

Physical artworks can referenced differently, depending on whether an image is being reproduced. See the Physical art works tab for more information.

The following are brief guidelines describing how to format figures when reproducing them in your assignments. These guidelines have been adapted from the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  Please refer to the indicated page numbers within the Publication Manual for further clarification and explanation.

Guidelines for figures:

  • Be selective in what figures, as well as the number of figures you include within your text.  Large numbers of figures may prove distracting to the reader (p. 225)
  • Figures should supplement rather than duplicate your text (p. 225)
  • If required, include a legend explaining symbols used within a figure (p. 229)
  • Figures must be numbered consecutively in the order in which they appear within the text, in italics, i.e. the first table is labeled 'Figure 1', the second 'Figure 2', and so on.  The figure number should be positioned above the figure (p. 227)
  • A brief title for the figure should be placed between the figure number and the figure.  The title should be descriptive of the contents of the figure.  Italicise the title and capitalise all important words (p. 226-227)
  • Include within the descriptive caption any acknowledgement that the figure is reproduced (or adapted from) another source (p. 229)
  • Figures should be mentioned in the text. Refer to each one by the figure number, e.g. (see Figure 1), highlighting only the point you want to emphasise (p. 197)

Figures taken from journal sources

 

If you are including a figure you found in another source within an assignment:

  • Copy the figure exactly as found in the original source, unless you need to adapt it.
  • Acknowledge the original source in-text and within a caption included directly underneath the figure.
  • Note that the format of the reference in the caption is different from the usual APA 6th style used for in-text citations.
  • While students don't usually require publisher permission to include figures in assignments, you should include the copyright statement.
  • There are 3 parts to successfully reproducing and referencing a figure in your assignments:
    1. Mention and cite the figure in your text
    2. Provide a description and caption for the figure
    3. Add an entry for the source in your reference list

Part 1 - Cite the article as you would normally and mention the figure in your text:

Levett-Jones et al. (2010) outlined the eight stages of the clinical reasoning cycle (see Figure 1), determining ...

Part 2 - Provide description and captioning of your figure:

[Above the figure]

Figure X  [Bolded, where X is your numbering]

Title of Figure

[Below the figure]

Note. From "Title of Article," by A. A. Author and B. B. Author, Year, Title of Journal, volume(issue), p. xx (https://doi.org/DOI). Copyright Year by Copyright Holder Name.

Figure 1

The Clinical Reasoning Process with Descriptors

Clinical Reasoning Cycle

Note. From “The 'Five Rights' of Clinical Reasoning: An Educational Model to Enhance Nursing Students' Ability to Identify and Manage Clinically 'At Risk' Patients," by T. Levett-Jones et al., 2010, Nurse Education Today, 30(6), p. 517 (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2009.10.020). Copyright 2010 by Elsevier.

Part 3 - Reference the article as you would normally:


Adapting or changing the figure?

 In the caption under the figure change the word 'From' to 'Adapted from' to show that you have changed the original (even in a small way). Using the example above, if we had changed something in the figure, we would change the caption to:

Note. Adapted from “The 'Five Rights' of Clinical Reasoning: An Educational Model to Enhance Nursing Students' Ability to Identify and Manage Clinically 'At Risk' Patients," by T. Levett-Jones et al., 2010, Nurse Education Today, 30(6), p. 517 (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2009.10.020). Copyright 2010 by Elsevier.

The in-text citation and reference list entry would stay the same.


Not reproducing the figure?

Follow the standard in-text citation and reference list entry to reference the article.


Reproduction note: 

The figure above, reprinted from Nurse Education Today, has been reproduced with permission. This notice is separate from the figure so as not to confuse the referencing in the figure caption.

Figures taken from authored books

 

If you are including a figure you found in another source within an assignment:

  • Copy the figure exactly as found in the original source, unless you need to adapt it.
  • Acknowledge the original source in-text and within a caption included directly underneath the figure.
  • Note that the format of the reference in the caption is different from the usual APA 6th style used for in-text citations.
  • While students don't usually require publisher permission to include figures in assignments, you should include the copyright statement.
  • There are 3 parts to successfully reproducing and referencing a figure in your assignments:
    1. Mention and cite the figure in your text
    2. Provide a description and caption for the figure
    3. Add an entry for the source in your reference list

The figure below is taken from an ebook where all of the content was written by the same author. In these cases the full book is referenced.  As this ebook does not use page numbers, the chapter information has been included instead to assist with locating the original.

Note that the ebook has been shared under a Creative Commons License so this information has been added to the copyright statement.

Part 1 - Cite the book as you would normally and mention the figure in your text:

Doyle and McCutcheon (2015) posit that poor-fitting masks are the main reason why many health care providers are exposed to pathogens, suggesting that simple care with mask choice can avoid many issues (see Figure 1) ...

Part 2 - Provide description and captioning of your figure:

[Above the figure]

Figure X  [Bolded, where X is your numbering]

Title of Figure

[Below the figure]

Note. From Title of Book (edition, p. xx), by A. A. Author and B. B. Author, Year, Publisher (DOI or link). Copyright Year by Copyright Holder Name.

Figure 1

Surgical mask (left) and N95 mask (right)

Note. From Clinical Procedures for Safer Patient Care​ (Ch. 1.4), by G. R. Doyle and J. A. McCutcheon, 2015, BCcampus (https://opentextbc.ca/clinicalskills/). Copyright 2015 by British Columbia Institute of Technology (Creative Commons).

Part 3 - Reference the book as you would normally:


Adapting or changing the figure?

 In the caption under the figure change the wording 'From' to 'Adapted from' to show that you have changed the original (even in a small way). Using the example above, if we had changed something in the figure, we would change the caption to:

Note. Adapted from Clinical Procedures for Safer Patient Care​ (Ch. 1.4), by G. R. Doyle and J. A. McCutcheon, 2015, BCcampus (https://opentextbc.ca/clinicalskills/). Copyright 2015 by British Columbia Institute of Technology (Creative Commons).

The in-text citation and reference list entry would stay the same.


Not reproducing the figure?

Follow the standard in-text citation and reference list entry to reference the book.


Reproduction note: 

The figure above, reprinted from Clinical Procedures for Safer Patient Care​, has been reproduced under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. This notice is separate from the figure so as not to confuse the referencing in the figure caption.

Figures taken from edited books

 

If you are including a figure you found in another source within an assignment:

  • Copy the figure exactly as found in the original source, unless you need to adapt it.
  • Acknowledge the original source in-text and within a caption included directly underneath the figure.
  • Note that the format of the reference in the caption is different from the usual APA 6th style used for in-text citations.
  • While students don't usually require publisher permission to include figures in assignments, you should include the copyright statement.
  • There are 3 parts to successfully reproducing and referencing a figure in your assignments:
    1. Mention and cite the figure in your text
    2. Provide a description and caption for the figure
    3. Add an entry for the source in your reference list

The figure below is taken from a chapter from an edited ebook where each chapter has different authors. In these cases the individual chapters are referenced.

Note that the ebook has been shared under a Creative Commons License so this information has been added to the copyright statement.

Part 1 - Cite the book chapter as you would normally and mention the figure in your text:

Figure 1 shows the physiology of airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) compared with conventional volume-targeted ventilation (Shaw, 2014) ...

Part 2 - Provide description and captioning of your figure:

[Above the figure]

Figure X  [Bolded, where X is your numbering]

Title of Figure

[Below the figure]

Note. From "Title of Chapter," by A. A. Author and B. B. Author, in C. C. Editor and D. D. Editor (Eds.), Year, Title of Book (edition, p. xx). Publisher (DOI or link). Copyright Year by Copyright Holder Name.

Figure 1

Airway pressure release ventilation versus conventional volume-targeted ventilation

Note. From "Principles of Mechanical Ventilation," by R. A. Shaw, in R. H. Rimawi (Ed.), 2014, Bedside Critical Care Guide (p. 2). OMICS International (http://www.esciencecentral.org/ebooks/bedside-critical-care-guide/pdf/bedside-critical-care-guide.pdf). Copyright 2014 by OMICS Group (Creative Commons).

Part 3 - Reference the book chapter as you would normally:


Adapting or changing the figure?

 In the caption under the figure change the word 'From' to 'Adapted from' to show that you have changed the original (even in a small way). Using the example above, if we had changed something in the figure, we would change the caption to:

Note. Adapted from "Principles of Mechanical Ventilation," by R. A. Shaw, in R. H. Rimawi (Ed.), 2014, Bedside Critical Care Guide (p. 2). OMICS International (http://www.esciencecentral.org/ebooks/bedside-critical-care-guide/pdf/bedside-critical-care-guide.pdf). Copyright 2014 by OMICS Group (Creative Commons).

The in-text citation and reference list entry would stay the same.


Not reproducing the figure?

Follow the standard in-text citation and reference list entry to reference the chapter.


Reproduction note: 

The figure above, reprinted from Bedside Critical Care Guide, has been reproduced under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. This notice is separate from the figure so as not to confuse the referencing in the figure caption.

Figures taken from web sources

 

There usually two categories of images used on web page sources:

  • Images created by the author of the web page
  • Images that have separate creator information listed

 

See the page for Images from the web.

If you are including a figure you found in another source within an assignment:

  • Copy the figure exactly as found in the original source, unless you need to adapt it.
  • Acknowledge the original source in-text and within a caption included directly underneath the figure.
  • Note that the format of the reference in the caption is different from the usual APA 6th style used for in-text citations.
  • While students don't usually require publisher permission to include figures in assignments, you should include the copyright statement.
  • There are 3 parts to successfully reproducing and referencing a figure in your assignments:
    1. Mention and cite the figure in your text
    2. Provide a description and caption for the figure
    3. Add an entry for the source in your reference list

Maps and Posters

 

Google Maps

APA considers Google maps as 'dynamic' so use (n.d.) for the year and add a retrieval date.

Online map or poster

The description would be either [Map] or [Poster]

Print map or poster

The description would be either [Map] or [Poster]

Map or poster with a corporate author Reference as above, but change the author to Corporate Author.

Maps and posters follow the same pattern as other figure types.  The example below uses a map from Google Maps.

There are 3 parts to successfully reproducing and referencing a figure in your assignments:

  1. Mention and cite the figure in your text
  2. Provide a description and caption for the figure
  3. Add an entry for the source in your reference list

Part 1 - Cite the source as you would normally and mention the figure in your text:

Figure 1 shows the location of the Library at the Ourimbah Campus (Google, 2020) ...

Part 2 - Provide description and captioning of your figure:

[Above the figure]

Figure X  [Bolded, where X is your numbering]

Title of Figure

[Below the figure]

Note. From Title of Work, by A. A. Author, Year (Link). Copyright Year by Copyright Holder Name.

[In the case of Google Maps, we will need to assign a title in square brackets.  See here for more.]

Figure 1

Ourimbah Campus Map Showing the Location of the Library

Note. From [Map of University of Newcastle, Ourimbah Campus, NSW, Australia], by Google, n.d. (https://goo.gl/maps/vpuFDVh1XR2nu1Pu6). Copyright 2020 by Google.

Part 3 - Reference the source:


Adapting or changing the figure?

 In the caption under the figure change the wording 'From' to 'Adapted from' to show that you have changed the original (even in a small way). Using the example above, if we had changed something in the figure, we would change the caption to:

Note. Adapted from [Map of University of Newcastle, Ourimbah Campus, NSW, Australia], by Google, n.d. (https://goo.gl/maps/vpuFDVh1XR2nu1Pu6). Copyright 2020 by Google.

The in-text citation and reference list entry would stay the same.


Not reproducing the figure?

Follow the standard in-text citation and reference list entry to reference the source.


Reproduction note: 

The map above, reprinted from Google Maps, has been reproduced in line with Google's Permissions policy. This notice is separate from the figure so as not to confuse the referencing in the figure caption.

Physical artworks

 

General Notes:

  • Use this to cite all types of museum and gallery artwork visited in-person, including sculptures, paintings, drawings, prints, installations, lithographs, etc.
  • For works viewed online, see the page for web images.
  • Titles of artworks should always be italicised.
  • Provide a description of kind of artwork in square brackets after the title to assist the reader in identifying the type of artwork.

  • You will need to add the location of the gallery or museum.
Physical artworks

Online images of artworks See the page for web images.

 

Reference list examples:

 


In-text

Every time you paraphrase, or use an idea from another source you must include an in-text citation to that source.
This is the general format for a source that has 1 author:  (Artist Surname, Year)

Examples:

The sculpture Balzac (Rodin, 1896) is a bronze reproduction, one of many recast by the artist from an original done in bronze and marble ...

Golden Summer, Eaglemont (Streeton, 1889) is one of the best known paintings of the Heidelberg School and has long been recognised as an Australian masterpiece. Painted in early 1889 during a Summer of drought, it was a consciously epic work ...

Referencing table sources

 

The following are brief guidelines describing how to format tables when reproducing them in your assignments. These guidelines have been adapted from the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  Please refer to the indicated page numbers within the Publication Manual for further clarification and explanation.

Guidelines for tables:

  • Be selective in what tables, as well as the number of tables you include within your text.  Large numbers of tables may prove distracting to the reader (p. 199)
  • The layout of the table should be logical and easily understood by the reader.  Select tables with a layout format which emphasises the feature of the data you are discussing (p. 199)
  • Tables should supplement rather than duplicate your text (p. 199)
  • Tables must be numbered consecutively in the order in which they appear within the text, in italics, i.e. the first table is labeled 'Table 1', the second 'Table 2', and so on.  The table number should be positioned above the table (p. 200)
  • A brief title for the table should be placed between the table number and the table.  The title should be descriptive of the contents of the table.  Italicise the title and capitalise all important words (p. 200-201)
  • Include within the descriptive caption any acknowledgement that the table is reproduced (or adapted from) another source (p. 198-199)
  • Tables should be mentioned in the text. Refer to each one by the table number, e.g. (see Table 1), highlighting only the point you want to emphasise (p. 197)

Tables taken from journal sources

 

If you are including a table you found in another source within an assignment:

  • Copy the table exactly as found in the original source, unless you need to adapt it.
  • Acknowledge the original source in-text and within a caption included directly underneath the table.
  • Note that the format of the reference in the caption is different from the usual APA 6th style used for in-text citations.
  • While students don't usually require publisher permission to include tables in assignments, you should include the copyright statement.
  • There are 3 parts to successfully reproducing and referencing a table in your assignments:
    1. Mention and cite the table in your text
    2. Provide a description and caption for the table
    3. Add an entry for the source in your reference list

Part 1 - Cite the article as you would normally and mention the table in your text:

Levett-Jones et al. (2010) suggest that novice nurses tend to ignore context, only following rules to collect cues (see Table 1). This leads to ...

Part 2 - Provide description and captioning of your table:

[Above the table]

Table X  [Bolded, where X is your numbering]

Title of Table

[Below the table]

Note. From "Title of Article," by A. A. Author and B. B. Author, Year, Title of Journal, volume(issue), p. xx (https://doi.org/DOI). Copyright Year by Copyright Holder Name.

Table 1

The Difference Between Cue Collection in Experienced and Novice Nurses

Note. From “The 'Five Rights' of Clinical Reasoning: An Educational Model to Enhance Nursing Students' Ability to Identify and Manage Clinically 'At Risk' Patients," by T. Levett-Jones et al., 2010, Nurse Education Today, 30(6), p. 518 (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2009.10.020). Copyright 2010 by Elsevier.

Part 3 - Reference the article as you would normally:


Adapting or changing the table?

 In the caption under the table change the word 'From' to 'Adapted from' to show that you have changed the original (even in a small way). Using the example above, if we had changed something in the table, we would change the caption to:

Note. Adapted from “The 'Five Rights' of Clinical Reasoning: An Educational Model to Enhance Nursing Students' Ability to Identify and Manage Clinically 'At Risk' Patients," by T. Levett-Jones et al., 2010, Nurse Education Today, 30(6), p. 518 (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2009.10.020). Copyright 2010 by Elsevier.

The in-text citation and reference list entry would stay the same.


Not reproducing the table?

Follow the standard in-text citation and reference list entry to reference the article.


Reproduction note: 

The table above, reprinted from Nurse Education Today, has been reproduced with permission. This notice is separate from the table so as not to confuse the referencing in the table caption.

Tables taken from authored books

 

If you are including a table you found in another source within an assignment:

  • Copy the table exactly as found in the original source, unless you need to adapt it.
  • Acknowledge the original source in-text and within a caption included directly underneath the table.
  • Note that the format of the reference in the caption is different from the usual APA 6th style used for in-text citations.
  • While students don't usually require publisher permission to include tables in assignments, you should include the copyright statement.
  • There are 3 parts to successfully reproducing and referencing a table in your assignments:
    1. Mention and cite the table in your text
    2. Provide a description and caption for the table
    3. Add an entry for the source in your reference list

The table below is taken from an ebook where all of the content was written by the same author. In these cases the full book is referenced.  As this ebook does not use page numbers, the chapter information has been included instead to assist with locating the original.

Note that the ebook has been shared under a Creative Commons License so this information has been added to the copyright statement.

Part 1 - Cite the book as you would normally and mention the table in your text:

Lowey (2015) lists a number of interventions nurses should consider, grouped according to the 'stage' of the end of life patient (see Table 1) ...

Part 2 - Provide description and captioning of your table:

[Above the table]

Table X  [Bolded, where X is your numbering]

Title of Table

[Below the table]

Note. From Title of Book (edition, p. xx), by A. A. Author and B. B. Author, Year, Publisher (DOI or link). Copyright Year by Copyright Holder Name.

Table 1

Nursing Interventions for the Stages of Dying

Note. From Nursing Care at the End of Life (Ch. 3), by S. E. Lowey, 2015. Open SUNY Textbooks (https://milnepublishing.geneseo.edu/nursingcare/). Copyright 2015 by Susan E. Lowey (Creative Commons).

Part 3 - Reference the book as you would normally:


Adapting or changing the table?

 In the caption under the table change the wording 'From' to 'Adapted from' to show that you have changed the original (even in a small way). Using the example above, if we had changed something in the table, we would change the caption to:

Note. Adapted from Nursing Care at the End of Life (Ch. 3), by S. E. Lowey, 2015. Open SUNY Textbooks (https://milnepublishing.geneseo.edu/nursingcare/). Copyright 2015 by Susan E. Lowey (Creative Commons).

The in-text citation and reference list entry would stay the same.


Not reproducing the table?

Follow the standard in-text citation and reference list entry to reference the book.


Reproduction note: 

The table above, reprinted from Nursing Care at the End of Life, has been reproduced under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. This notice is separate from the table so as not to confuse the referencing in the table notes.

Tables taken from edited books

 

If you are including a table you found in another source within an assignment:

  • Copy the table exactly as found in the original source, unless you need to adapt it.
  • Acknowledge the original source in-text and within a caption included directly underneath the table.
  • Note that the format of the reference in the caption is different from the usual APA 6th style used for in-text citations.
  • While students don't usually require publisher permission to include tables in assignments, you should include the copyright statement.
  • There are 3 parts to successfully reproducing and referencing a table in your assignments:
    1. Mention and cite the table in your text
    2. Provide a description and caption for the table
    3. Add an entry for the source in your reference list

The table below is taken from a chapter from an edited ebook where each chapter has different authors. In these cases the individual chapters are referenced.

Note that the ebook has been shared under a Creative Commons License so this information has been added to the copyright statement.

Part 1 - Cite the book chapter as you would normally and mention the table in your text:

Gliga et al. (2014) suggest differing causes for acute upper GI bleed (AUGIB) and acute lower GI bleed (ALGIB)  (see Table 1) ...

Part 2 - Provide description and captioning of your table:

[Above the table]

Table X  [Bolded, where X is your numbering]

Title of Table

[Below the table]

Note. From "Title of Chapter," by A. A. Author and B. B. Author, in C. C. Editor and D. D. Editor (Eds.), Year, Title of Book (edition, p. xx). Publisher (DOI or link). Copyright Year by Copyright Holder Name.

Table 1

Causes of AUGIB and ALGIB

Note. From "Bedside Approach to Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the Intensive Care Unit," by D. A. Gliga et al., in R. H. Rimawi (Ed.), 2014, Bedside Critical Care Guide (p. 13). OMICS International (http://www.esciencecentral.org/ebooks/bedside-critical-care-guide/pdf/bedside-critical-care-guide.pdf). Copyright 2014 by OMICS Group (Creative Commons).

Part 3 - Reference the book chapter as you would normally:


Adapting or changing the table?

 In the caption under the table change the word 'From' to 'Adapted from' to show that you have changed the original (even in a small way). Using the example above, if we had changed something in the tablee, we would change the caption to:

Note. Adapted from "Bedside Approach to Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the Intensive Care Unit," by D. A. Gliga et al., in R. H. Rimawi (Ed.), 2014, Bedside Critical Care Guide (p. 13). OMICS International (http://www.esciencecentral.org/ebooks/bedside-critical-care-guide/pdf/bedside-critical-care-guide.pdf). Copyright 2014 by OMICS Group (Creative Commons).

The in-text citation and reference list entry would stay the same.


Not reproducing the table?

Follow the standard in-text citation and reference list entry to reference the chapter.


Reproduction note: 

The table above, reprinted from Bedside Critical Care Guide, has been reproduced under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. This notice is separate from the table so as not to confuse the referencing in the table caption.

Using figures and tables in PowerPoint slides

 

Adding referencing information to PowerPoints varies slightly to a document-based assignment for figures and tables as there is often no in-text referencing.

Below is a recommended guide for what to include in a PowerPoint slide to include suitable referencing in your assignments.

Step 1 - Work out what you have

Is your figure or table from the web, a book or an article? Look at the information on the tabs on this page to confirm the basics.

In the example below, we're using an image that has the same creator as the web page hosting it.  This photograph has been shared under a Creative Commons License so we will need to add this information to the copyright statement.

Step 2 - Add the figure/table and its caption to the slide

Add the figure or table to your slide, with an appropriate the caption for the chosen resource.

For this example, the required caption would be:

Note. From VTE Production Gallery, by Interprofessional Education for Quality Use of Medicines, 2016 (http://www.ipeforqum.com.au/photos/vte-production). Copyright 2016 by IPE for QUM (Creative Commons).

If you are resizing the figure to fill the whole slide, you still need to add a caption.

To do this, add a text-box at the bottom of the image, making the text a suitable colour to be read (e.g. white for dark images).  Choose an appropriate text size so that the caption can be easily read, but not too large so that it is distracting.

Step 3 - Add the full reference

Create a new slide for referencing at the end of your PowerPoint.  Add the full reference for your figure or table as directed on the tabs on this page.

To create the hanging indent required for APA in PowerPoint, follow these directions.
The alternate option is to create a reference list in Word and use a screen capture tool (such as 'Snipping Tool') to take an image of the text.  This image can then be inserted into the PowerPoint slide - it will look like standard text, but the formatting will be locked in place.


Reproduction note: 

The figure above, reprinted from IPEforQUM.com.au​, has been reproduced under a Creative Commons Attribution - ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. This notice is separate from the figure so as not to confuse the referencing in the figure caption.

Including figures and tables when writing for publication

 

If you are including a figure or table you found in another source, and you are WRITING FOR PUBLICATION (journal, conference, thesis, website, etc.) you must:

  • Obtain written permission from the copyright owner to include the figure or table in your work
  • Copy the figure or table exactly as found in the original source, unless you need to adapt it.
  • Acknowledge the original source within the figure caption or table note.
  • This is the case even if you change or adapt something in the figure or table.

Follow the directions on the other tabs, dependent on the source of your figure or table.

When you have received permission to reuse the figure or table, add the sentence "Reprinted with permission." to the end of the caption.

Note that the in-text citation and reference list entry are still required.

Figure 1

The Clinical Reasoning Process with Descriptors

Clinical Reasoning Cycle

Note. From “The 'Five Rights' of Clinical Reasoning: An Educational Model to Enhance Nursing Students' Ability to Identify and Manage Clinically 'At Risk' Patients," by T. Levett-Jones et al., 2010, Nurse Education Today, 30(6), p. 517 (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2009.10.020). Copyright 2010 by Elsevier. Reprinted with permission.


Adapting or changing the figure or table?

 In the caption underneath change the words:

  • 'From' to 'Adapted from'
  • 'Reprinted with permission' to 'Adapted with permission'

to show that you have changed the original (even in a small way). Using the example above, if we had changed something in the figure, we would change the caption to:

Note. Adapted from “The 'Five Rights' of Clinical Reasoning: An Educational Model to Enhance Nursing Students' Ability to Identify and Manage Clinically 'At Risk' Patients," by T. Levett-Jones et al., 2010, Nurse Education Today, 30(6), p. 517 (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2009.10.020). Copyright 2010 by Elsevier. Adapted with permission.

The in-text citation and reference list entry would stay the same.


Reproduction note: 

The figure above, reprinted from Nurse Education Today, has been reproduced with permission. This notice is separate from the figure so as not to confuse the referencing in the figure caption.


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UON Referencing Guide