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University of Newcastle Library guides

APA 7th Style:  Education resources

UON Library guide for the APA 7th referencing style

Syllabus documents

 

General Notes:

  • Syllabus documents follow the same pattern as books and ebooks written by a corporate author.

  • Electronic syllabus documents usually have material for the complete K-10. For print editions, some syllabus documents are separated into multiple volumes, e.g. Mathematics, where K-6 is Volume 1 and 7-10 is Volume 2.

  • If you are referring to syllabus information on a website (rather than a downloaded document), you should cite the information as a web page.
  • Note that while the Board Of Studies NSW is now known as the NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA), older syllabus documents will still have the original name. Use the author as stated on each syllabus document - do not change it.
  • Titles of these documents should always be italicised.

  • Online documents are considered 'static' by APA standards and therefore do not require the words 'Retrieved from' before an access link.  This is a major revision for APA 7. 

  • Do not include a full-stop after the URL at the end of the reference.

  • APA allows for links to be either plain text or 'active'. See the official APA Style Blog for more information.

Online syllabus document

Print syllabus document

 

Reference list examples:

 

Where more than one syllabus is needed for referencing, refer to the information under Year/Date on the Reference list page of this guide (reference examples provided below).

 


In-text

Every time you paraphrase, or use an idea from another source you must include an in-text citation to that source.
Follow the general pattern:  (Corporate Author, Year)

Example:

...should be discussed with parents (NSW Education Standards Authority, 2017).

 

Direct Quotations

If you include a direct quote, that is word-for-word from a source, add a page reference to your in-text citation, e.g.:

... “set of broad learning outcomes” (NSW Education Standards Authority, 2017, p. 4).

Need to reference more than one form in-text?  See the tab for Same author/s and same year on the page for In-text Citations

Graded (or guided) reading programmes

 

General Notes:

  • There are a number of reading programmes that offer guided/graded levels, grouped by number or colour. These include (but are not limited to) PM Library/Plus/Benchmark, Springboard, Winners, Oxford Literacy, Macmillan Readers, and Sunshine Classics. More information about graded readers can be found on our pages for Huxley Library and Ourimbah Library.

  • The 'readers' within these programmes usually have individual titles, authors, and ISBNs. The Library has received confirmation from APA that readers should be treated as individual book titles and referenced accordingly.

  • Where the reader has images/pictures, it may also be appropriate to include the illustrator (or photographer) as an 'author'. The APA Style Blog suggested for APA 6 that if the images are essential to the story being understood, both creators should be identified as authors where both creators have contributed to the work in a major way and are listed on the cover (e.g. for a graphic novel or a children's picture book).
  • For other children's books see the next tab on this page. For graphic novels, see the page for Books.

Reader with single author

Reader with author and artist

(see note above)

Where the 2nd author is the illustrator or photographer.

 

Reference list examples:

 


In-text

Every time you paraphrase, or use an idea from another source you must include an in-text citation to that source.
Follow the general patterns:  (Author Surname, Year)  or  (1st Author Surname & 2nd Author Surname, Year)

Example:

... they had a fun time (Michaels & Parton, 2005).

 

Direct Quotations

If you include a direct quote, that is word-for-word from a source, add a page reference to your in-text citation, e.g.:

... where Michael remarked, “It's time to eat!” (Reilly & Edwards, 2013, p. 4).

Children's books

 

General Notes:

  • Children's books should be referenced following the standard guidelines for books, the main difference being that in addition to a writer, there can also be an artist.

  • Where the book has images/pictures, it may also be appropriate to include the illustrator (or photographer) as an 'author'. The APA Style Blog suggested for APA 6 that if the images are essential to the story being understood, both creators should be identified as authors where both creators have contributed to the work in a major way and are listed on the cover (e.g. for a graphic novel or a children's picture book).

  • Include the creators in the order they are listed on the book. Standard order is usually writer/s then artist/s, but this is not always the case.
  • As with any book, include an edition statement if one is given, e.g. Possum Magic below is the 30th anniversary edition.
  • For other children's books see the next tab on this page. For graphic novels, see the page for Books.

Children's book with single author
Children's book with author and artist (see note above)

Where the 2nd author is the illustrator or photographer.

 

Reference list examples:

 


In-text

Every time you paraphrase, or use an idea from another source you must include an in-text citation to that source.
Follow the general patterns:  (Author Surname, Year)  or  (1st Author Surname & 2nd Author Surname, Year)

Example:

... they had a fun time (Michaels & Parton, 2005).

 

Direct Quotations

If you include a direct quote, that is word-for-word from a source, add a page reference to your in-text citation, e.g.:

... where Michael remarked, “It's time to eat!” (Reilly & Edwards, 2013, p. 4).

Documents from intranet locations

 

General Notes:

  • Electronic documents viewed while on placement or at work may only be available via a secured intranet or staff-only network location.

  • APA suggests considering the readership of the document you're writing before referencing this material - will the person reading your document being able to access the material you're citing?  This will direct you to which pattern to follow.

  • Where the type of document is not obvious, you may need to add a description in square brackets after the title, e.g. [Staff information sheet].

  • Note that the examples listed below are for illustration purposes only and are not taken from actual documents.

Intranet document available to your reader/s

The link used should be for the log-in page.

Intranet document unavailable to your reader/s

Reference as a personal communication

No reference list entry, but make reference to the type of document in your text (see example below).

 

Reference list examples:

For a resource available to your reader/s

For a resource not available to your reader/s

No reference list entry.


In-text

Every time you paraphrase, or use an idea from another source you must include an in-text citation to that source.


Where the reader will be able to access the document you are citing, follow the general pattern for the number of authors.

 

Where the reader will be unable to access the document you are citing, you can follow the pattern below:

(Initial. Author Surname, personal communication, Month Day, Year)  or

(Corporate Author, personal communication, Month Day, Year)

Wallsend High requires staff to follow strict guidelines when dealing with troubled students, as detailed in a best practice guide located on the staff intranet (Wallsend High, personal communication, May 2, 2019).

Difficult-to-reference textbooks

 

For advice on how to reference chapters from 'difficult' textbooks such as:

see the Book chapters page for more information.

 

For other textbooks with clear authors or editors see the information on the pages for Books and/or Book chapters.


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UON Referencing Guide