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University of Newcastle Library guides

Chicago B: Author-Date Style:  Other: statistics, standards, etc.

UON Library guide to Chicago B: Author-Date Style 17th edition

Citing other sources

Select a tab to view the general rules and examples for various other sources

Book reviews

 

Book reviews can be published in a variety of sources such as newspapers or journals. When citing book reviews, the general formatting is reliant on the source material in which the book review is published, but the following information should be always added after the title of the review in the format of Review of Title of book, by Author's First and Last Name.

 

The general format for citing a book review:

Reviewer's Last Name, First Name. Year. "Title of Review." Review of Title of book, by Author's First and Last NameTitle of Source Work, vol no, issue no (Month or Season of Publication): Page Range. DOI or URL. 

 

Example:

Kakutani, Michiko. 2016. "Zadie Smith’s ‘Swing Time’ Explores Friends’ Diverging Paths." Review of Swing Time, by Zadie Smith. New York Times, November 7, 2016. https://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/08/books/zadie-smiths-swing-time-explores-friends-diverging-paths.html.

Schatz, Bruce R. 2000. "Learning by Text or Context?" Review of The Social Life of Information, by John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. Science, 290, no. 5495 (November):1304. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.290.5495.1304.

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Case studies

 

Chicago does not have a specific format for how to reference case studies as an individual resource - the formatting is reliant on the source material in which the case study is found, e.g. for a case study featured in a book, you would reference the book.

If required for your assignment, the case study can be specifically mentioned in your text, just add the standard citation for the source. As the case study is something specific within a larger resource, it is recommended that you add a page number to your in-text citation to help the reader locate it.

Data sets

 

To cite a data set, the minimum elements include the name of the dataset, a descriptive phrase or record locator (such as a data marker or accession number) indicating the part of the dataset being cited or explaining the nature of the reference, an access date, and a URL. In reference list, list under the name of the dataset. For example:

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (Dataset Name Year of Publication if available) ...

... (GenBank) ...

 

Reference list entry: format and example

Dataset Name. Description or record locator. Access Date. DOI or URL.

GenBank (for RP11-322N14 BAC [accession number AC087526.3]; accessed July 6, 2018). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/19683167.

Patents

 

Cite the patents under the names of the creators, followed by issuing year, patent name, patent no, filing date and issuing date (note that the year of issue is repeated to avoid ambiguity), and the source from which the patent information can be retrieved. 

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (Creator's Last Name Year of Issue) ...

... (Iizuka and Tanaka 1986) ...

 

Reference list entry: format and example

Creator's Last Names, First Name. Year. Patent Name. Patent No, filing date, issuing Date. DOI or URL.

Iizuka, Masanori, and Hideki Tanaka. 1986. Cement Admixture. US Patent 4,586,960, filed June 26, 1984, and issued May 6, 1986. https://patents.google.com/patent/US4586960.

Reference works

 

For information on how to reference entries or chapters from reference works such as:

  • Dictionaries
  • Encyclopaedias
  • Thesaurii
  • Indexes, etc

see the Book chapters page.

Be sure to check with your lecturer if these kinds of resources are suitable for use in your assignments.

'Research Starters' from the Library Catalogue

 

For Research Starters accessed from the Library catalogue, refer to the Book Chapters page.

Be sure to check with your lecturer if these kinds of resources are suitable for use in your assignments.

Standards

 

To cite a standard published by a specific industry group or by a national or international standards organization, include the name of the organization, the title of the standard (in italics), an edition or other identifying number or label, and publication information. Standards consulted online should include a URL. In the reference list, list the standard under the group or organization, even if that entity is also the publisher. 

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (Organisation Year of Publication) ...

... (Standards Australia 2008) ...

 

Reference list entry: format and example

Organisation. Year. Title of Standard. Standard No. Place of Publication: Publisher. URL.

Standards Australia. 2008. The Storage and Handling of Corrosive Substances. AS 3780-2008. SAI Global. https://www.saiglobal.com.

National Information Standards Organization. 2005. Bibliographic References. ANSI/NISO Z39.29-2005. Bethesda, MD: NISO, approved June 9, 2005; reaffirmed May 13, 2010.

ABS Statistics

 

The following is the general format of a reference to an ABS document. Add the URL if the document is found online. 

  • If the author and publisher are both Australian Bureau of Statistics, the publisher can be abbreviated to ABS.
  • If there are personal authors, cite the item by the personal authors and use the full name of publisher: Australian Bureau of Statistics. 

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (Australian Bureau of Statistics Year of Publication) ...

... (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2018) ...

 

Reference list entry: format and example

Australian Bureau of Statistics. Year. Title: Subtitle. Catalog No. CanberraABS. URL.

Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2019. Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2017-18. Cat. no. 3218.0. Canberra: ABS. http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/3218.0.

 


The general format (i.e. NOT Chicago specific) for referencing ABS publications is available online from the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

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