Skip to main content
University of Newcastle Library guides

Chicago B: Author-Date Style:  Book chapters

UON Library guide to Chicago B: Author-Date Style 17th edition

Book chapters

 

General rules:

 

The following information is for reference list entries. See also:

Author Names

  • Appear first in the reference. Use the full names of authors and invert only the first author in reference list.
  • In-text citations list all authors when a chapter has up to 3 authors; list only the first author followed by et al. for 4 or more authors.
  • Reference list entry lists all authors when a chapter has up to 10 authors; for more than 10 authors, list the first 7 followed by et al.

Chapter Titles

  • The title of the chapter appears after the author, and is enclosed in quotation marks.
  • Capitalise all words in the chapter title and sub-title (except for common words - of, and, etc).

Editor Names

  • Use the editor's full names (first name first) in reference list.
  • List all for up to 10 editors, or the first 7 followed by et al. for more than 10 editors.

Book Titles

  • Capitalise all words in the book title and sub-title (except for common words - of, and, etc).
  • Book titles appear in italics.

Edition

  • The edition other than the first is cited and placed after the title. The standard first edition is not cited. 
  • Terms of edition are abbreviated, e.g. 2nd ed. (Second Edition), rev. ed. (Revised Edition), or 1st Aust. ed. (First Australian Edition).
  • Remove any superscript from editions when typing - all letters should be on the same line (e.g. 2nd ed.).

Page Numbers or chapter number

  • In-text citation may list the page(s) cited, or the chapter number.
  • Inclusive page numbers for the chapter or the chapter number are included in the reference list.

Place of Publication

  • Place of publication is the city where the publisher’s main editorial offices are located.
  • Include the first place of publication, if more than one is listed.
  • If the city may be confused with another city of the same name, the abbreviation of the state or country is usually added.

Publisher

  • The publisher’s name may be given either in full or in an abbreviated form.
  • Omit an initial The from a publisher’s name and the words such as "Inc.", "Ltd.", "Co.", or "& Co."

Year of Publication 

  • For books and book chapters, only the year, not the month or day, is included in the publication date.
  • When the publication date of a printed work is unknown, the abbreviation n.d. takes the place of the year.

eBooks Chapter

  • Chapters in ebooks may have their own individual DOI, so where possible use the chapter DOI rather than the one for the whole book.
  • For books consulted online, include the DOI if available or the URL at the end of the citation.
  • For an ebook located from a library database without a DOI, add the name of the database, instead of the URL, at the end of the citation.
  • For other types of eBooks, add the application, format, device, or medium consulted at the end of citation, e.g. Kindle.

Secondary Sources

For citations taken from secondary sources, see the Secondary Sources page

Book chapters with 1 author

 

The following is the general format of a reference to a book chapter with one author from an edited book. Ignore the editor's element if the book is a single-author book (the book author is the author for all chapters), as shown in example 2, or simply reference the whole book.

See the general rules for book chapters for more details. 

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (Chapter Author's Last Name Year of Publication) ...

... (Ashman 2008) ...

... (Brower 2015) ...

 

Reference list entry: format and example

Chapter Author's Last Names, First Name. Year. "Chapter Title." In Book Title: Subtitle, edition, edited by Editor's First and Last Names, inclusive Page (or chapter) numbers. Place of Publication: Publisher. 

AshmanAdrian. 2009.Contemporary Cultures and Education.” In Education for Inclusion and Diversity, 3rd ed., edited by Adrian Ashman and John Elkins, 3-34. Frenchs Forest: Pearson Education Australia. 

Brower, Kate Andersen. 2015. “Backstairs Gossip and Mischief.” In The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House, 207–22. New York: Harper.

 

Book chapters with 2-3 authors

 

When a chapter has 2-3 authors, list them all and use and (not &) before the last author. 

The following is the general format of a reference to a book chapter with 2 and 3 authors from an edited book. Omit the editor's element if the book is a single-author book (not an edited book with different chapter authors).

See the general rules for book chapters for more details. 

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (Chapter Author's Last Name Year of Publication) ...

... (Juvonen and Graham 2004) ...

... (Renner, Brew, and Proctor 2013) ...

 

Reference list entry: format and example

First Chapter Author's Last Names, First Name, 2nd and 3rd Chapter Authors' First Name Last Name.  Year. "Chapter Title." In Book Title: Subtitle, edition, edited by Editor's First and Last Names, inclusive Page (or chapter) numbers. Place of Publication: Publisher.

Juvonen, Jaana, and Sandra Graham.  2004. “Research Based Interventions on Bullying.” In Bullying: Implications for the Classroom, edited by Cheryl E. Sanders and Gary D. Phye, 229-55. San Diego: Elsevier Academic Press. 

Renner, Adam, Bridget Brew, and Crystal Proctor. 2013. “Plotting Inequality, Building Resistance.” In Rethinking Mathematics: Teaching Social Justice by the Numbers, 2nd ed., edited by Eric Gutstein and Bob Peterson, 175-180. Milwaukee: Rethinking Schools.

 

Book chapters with 4+ authors

 

When a chapter has 4 or more authors, list only the first author followed by et al. in the in-text citations; List all for up to 10 authors, or  for more than 10 authors, the first 7 followed by et al. in the reference list.

The following is the general format of a reference to a book chapter with 4 or more authors from an edited book. Omit the editor's element if the book is a single-author book (i.e. not an edited book with different chapter authors).

See the general rules for book chapters for more details. 

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (First Chapter Author's Last Name et al. Year of Publication) ...

... (Marsh et al. 2004) ...

 

Reference list entry: format and example

First Chapter Author's Last Names, First Name, Other Chapter Authors' First Name Last Name. Year. "Chapter Title." In Book Title: Subtitle, edition, edited by Editor's First and Last Names, inclusive Page (or chapter) numbers. Place of Publication: Publisher.

Marsh, Herbert W., Roberto H. Parada, Rhonda G. Craven, and Linda Finger. 2004. “In the Looking Glass: A Reciprocal Effects Model Elucidating the Complex Nature of Bullying, Psychological Determinants, and the Central Role of Self-Concept.” In Bullying: Implications for the Classroom, edited by Cheryl E. Sanders and Gary D. Phye, 63-106. San Diego: Elsevier Academic Press. 

eBook chapters with a DOI

 

eBook chapters follow the same formatting patterns as those of physical books, but add the DOI to the end of the citation. 

The following is the general format of a reference to an ebook chapter from an edited book. Omit the editor's element if the book is a single-author book (i.e. not an edited book with different chapter authors). If no fixed page numbers are available, cite a section title or other number in the text citation, if any (or simply omit).

See the general rules for book chapters for more details. 

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (Chapter Author's Last Name Year of Publication) ...

... (Lamb 2010) ...

 

Reference list entry: format and example

Chapter Author's Last Names, First Name. Year. "Chapter Title." In Book Title: Subtitle, edition, edited by Editor's First and Last Names, inclusive Page (or chapter) numbers. Place of Publication: Publisher. DOI.

Lamb, Stephen. 2010. “School Dropout and Completion in Australia.” In School Dropout and Completion: International Comparative Studies in Theory and Policy​, edited by Stephen Lamb, Eifred Markussen, Richard TeeseJohn, and PoleselNina Sandberg, 321-339. Dordrecht: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-90-481-9763-7_18.

 

General guidelines:

  • Some ebooks do not include page numbers - in these cases, use the chapter number instead.
  • Chapters in ebooks may have their own individual DOI so where possible use the chapter DOI rather than the one for the whole book.
  • Include a full-stop after the DOI at the end of the reference.
  • eBooks do not require an access date unless the date of publication is not available.

eBook chapters with a URL or database name

 

eBook chapters follow the same formatting patterns as those of physical books, but add the DOI or URL or Database Name, or the media maker such as Kindle, to the end of the citation. If the eBook doesn't have a DOI, use the URL if the book is freely available on the web; use the name of the database if the book is located in a commercial database (e.g., through a library).

The following is the general format of a reference to an eBook chapter from an edited book without a DOI. Omit the editor's element if the book is a single-author book (i.e. not an edited book with different chapter authors). If no fixed page numbers are available, cite a section title or other number in the text citation, if any (or simply omit).

See the general rules for book chapters for more details. 

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (Chapter Author's Last Name Year of Publication) ...

  ... (Martin 2014) ...

 

Reference list entry: format and example

Chapter Author's Last Names, First Name. Year. "Chapter Title." In Book Title: Subtitle, edition, edited by Editor's First and Last Names, inclusive Page (or chapter) numbers. Place of Publication: Publisher. URL or Database Name.

Martin, Andrew J. 2014. “Student Motivation and Engagement: Strategies for Parents and Educators.” In Better Than OK: Helping Young People to Flourish at School and Beyond, edited by Helen Street and Neil Porter, 41-47. Chicago: Fremantle Press. ProQuest Ebook Central.

 

General guidelines:

  • Some eBooks do not include page numbers - in these cases, use the chapter number instead.
  • Do not insert a hyphen if you need to break a URL across lines. Break the URL before a slash or dash or at another logical division point.
  • If the book is located in one of the library databases, use the database name instead of the URL.
  • Include a full-stop after the URL or database name at the end of the reference.
  • eBooks do not require an access date unless the date of publication is not available.

Entries/chapters from reference works

 

Be sure to check with your lecturer if these kinds of resources are suitable for use in your assignments.

 

General notes:

  • Reference works include dictionaries, encyclopaedias, thesaurii, handbooks, indexes, etc.
  • It is often sufficient to simply describe the reference content in the text, unless there is a need for a reference list entry.
  • If a DOI is assigned it should be included in the reference. Otherwise, include the URL or database name.
  • For entries without an author, cite the entry using the entry title.
  • No access date is required unless the date of publication is not available..
  • Remove the university proxy information from the DOI or URL [e.g. use http://www.oed.com NOT http://www.oed.com.ezproxy.newcastle.edu.au/]
  • For 'Research Starters' from the Library catalogue (NewCat+), see the next tab on this page.

The following is the general format of a reference to an entry from an electronic reference book. Omit the last element if the source is in print.

See the general rules for book chapters for more details. 

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (Chapter Author's Last Name Year of Publication) ...

  ... (Middleton [2004] 2017) ...

 

Reference list entry: format and example

Entry Author's Last Names, First Name. Year. "Entry Title." In Book Title: Subtitle, edition, edited by Editor's First and Last Names, inclusive Page numbers. Place of Publication: Publisher. DOI or URL or Database Name.

Middleton, Richard. (2004) 2017. “Lennon, John Ono (1940–1980).” In Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online ed. Oxford University Presshttps://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/31351.

'Research Starters' from the Library Catalogue

 

Be sure to check with your lecturer if these kinds of resources are suitable for use in your assignments.

 

Short 'articles' called 'Research Starters' can often be found in the Library catalogue (NewCat+) when searching for certain topics. These are usually taken from sources such as encyclopaedias or other reference works. Therefore, their citation would follow the same pattern as entries from reference works with the database name as Research Starters.

The following is the general format of a reference to a Research Starter entry. See the general rules for book chapters for more details. 

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (Entry Author's Last Name Year of Publication) ...

... (Vallente 2016) ...

 

Reference list entry: format and example

Entry Author's Last Names, First Name. Year. "Entry Title." In Book Title: Subtitle, edition, edited by Editor's First and Last Names, inclusive Page numbers. Place of Publication: Publisher. Database Name.

Vallente, Rhea U. 2016. “Clinical Reasoning.” In Salem Press Encyclopedia of Health.​ Salem Press. Research Starters.

 

The search results screen for the example used above is shown below:

 

The source for the information will be included in the resource:

 

For this example, the publisher is Salem Press.

Introduction, preface, foreword, or afterword

 

Citing the introduction, preface, foreword, or afterword is similar to citing a book chapter, but add the relevant descriptive term before the book title. If the author of the introduction or other part is someone other than the main author of a book, that author comes first, and the author of the book follows the title. In a reference list entry, include the page number range for the part cited.

The following is the general format of a reference to an introduction, preface, foreword, or afterword from a book and an edited book. 

See the general rules for book chapters for more details. 

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (Preface Author's Last Name Year of publication) ...

... (Felstiner 2001) ...

... (Wallach 2000) ...

... (Mansfield and Winthrop 2000) ...

 

Works-cited list entry: format and example

Preface Author's Last Names, First Name. Year. "Preface Title." Preface to Book Title: Subtitle, edition, by Author's First and Last Names, Page range of preface. Other contributors. Place of publisher: Publisher.

Felstiner, John. 2001. Preface to Selected Poems and Prose of Paul Celan, by Paul Celan, xix-xxxxviTranslated by John Felstiner. New York: W. W. Norton.

Mansfield, Harvey, and Delba Winthrop. 2000. Introduction to Democracy in America, by Alexis de Tocqueville, xvii–lxxxvi. Translated and edited by Harvey Mansfield and Delba Winthrop. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Wallach, Rick. 2000. “Cormac McCarthy's Canon as Accidental Artifact.” Introduction to Myth, Legend, Dust: Critical Responses to Cormac McCarthy, xiv-xvi. Edited by Rich WallachManchester: Manchester University Press. 

 

Course Readers and Compiled Texts ('Custom Book Editions')

 

Course readers and compiled texts are usually collections of chapters and articles specifically chosen as readings for a particular subject.

To reference from these publications see the notes on the Course Material page.

Ask The Library

Ask The Library