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University of Newcastle Library guides

Chicago B: Author-Date Style:  Images, art works, maps, tables, etc.

UON Library guide to Chicago B: Author-Date Style 17th edition

Figures, tables, art works, maps, and other images

 

Chicago style uses the terminology 'illustrations' or 'figures' when discussing images presented separately from the run of text in sources. 'Figures' includes the following image types:

  • Charts or Graphs
  • Maps (included in sources, see the separate Maps tab for citing the standalone maps)
  • Paintings, drawings, photographs, or other art works (included in sources, see the separate Art works tab for citing the standalone art works)

Information about standalone maps, paintings, photographs, sculptures, or other works of art can usually be presented in the text rather than in a reference list. If a reference list entry is needed, see the tabs above for Maps and Art works for instructions. 

Note that tables are a separate designation with differing rules. See the Tables tab above for more information.

 

General rules: citing vs using images

 

Citing illustrations

  • When citing (not reprinting) an illustration from a book, article or other sources, cite the source first, then provide the page number where the illustration is located in text citation, preceding the figure number, with a comma between them, e.g. ... (Smith 2019, 123, fig. 3)
  • When citing illustrations, the abbreviation fig. may be used for figure, but table, map, plate, and other illustration forms are spelled out.
  • If the source is available online, add the DOI or URL to the end of the citation.

In-text citation example: 

... (Anderson 2018, fig. 8.1)...

Reference list entry example:

Anderson, Catherine. 2018. Essentials of Linguistics. McMaster University. https://ecampusontario.pressbooks.pub/essentialsoflinguistics/.

 

Using (reprinting or adapting) illustrations

  • Figures and tables taken from other sources require credit lines. A credit line is a brief statement of the source of an illustration. In addition to author, title, publication details, and copyright statement, the credit line should include any page or figure number. A credit line usually appears at the end of a caption of a figure, or in a source note of a table. 
  • Figures and tables must be numbered consecutively in Arabic numerals (1, 2, 3, etc)  in the order in which they appear within the text, i.e. the first figure is labeled "Figure 1", the second "Figure 2", and so on. 
  • Refer to each figure or table in text by their number, e.g. figure 1, table 4, etc.
  • If you are WRITING FOR PUBLICATION (for a journal, conference paper, thesis, website, etc) you must obtain written permission from the copyright owner to include the figure or table in your work, and state the permission in the source citation as 'Reprinted with permission from ...'
  • Copyright holder may be the publisher, author/s, artists or their children, or the museums.
  • While students don't usually require publisher permission to include figures or tables in assignments, you should still include the credit line with copyright statement.
  • If the work being credited is listed in the reference list, only a shortened form needs appear in the credit line.

Citing Figures

 

Note: Figures taken from other sources require source citations and credit lines. See the Using Figures taken from other sources below for more details.

When citing (not reprinting) a figure from a book, article or other sources, cite the source as usual and add the page number and figure number in the text citation.  

The following is the general format of a reference to a figure in a book. If the source is available online, add the DOI or URL to the end of the citation.

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (Author's Last Name Year of Publication, Page no, Figure No) ...

... (Anderson 2018, fig. 8.1)...

 

Reference list entry: format and example

First Author's Last Names, First Name, Other Author's First and Last Names. Year. Book Title: Subtitle. Edition. Place of Publication: Publisher. DOI or URL.

Anderson, Catherine. 2018. Essentials of Linguistics. McMaster University. https://ecampusontario.pressbooks.pub/essentialsoflinguistics/.

 

 

Using figures taken from other sources

 

If you are including a figure from another source in your assignment, you need provide the source citation and credit lines with the figure. If the work being credited is listed in the reference list, only a shortened form needs appear in the credit line, e.g. Reprinted from Doyle and McCutcheon (2015, chap. 1.4).

  • Copy the figure exactly as found in the original source, unless you need to adapt it.
  • Number figures consecutively in Arabic numerals (1, 2, 3, etc) as they appear in your assignment
  • Acknowledge the original source following the caption directly underneath the figure.
  • Captions should be capitalized in sentence style
  • In addition to author, title, publication details, and copyright date by copyright holder, the credit line should include any page or figure number.
  • Copyright holder may be the publisher or the author/s
  • While students don't usually require publisher permission to include figures in assignments, you should still include the copyright statement.

The following is an example of reprinting a figure from a book. For reusing figures from other sources, follow the citation pattern for that source

 

Figure 1. Surgical mask (left) and N95 mask (right). Reprinted from Glynda Rees Doyle and Jodie Anita McCutcheon, Clinical Procedures for Safer Patient Care  (BCcampus, 2015), chap. 1.4, https://opentextbc.ca/clinicalskills/. Copyright 2015 by British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) (Creative Commons).

[This eBook does not use page numbers so the chapter information has been included instead. This will assist with locating the original figure]

 


Adapting or changing the figure?

 In the caption under the figure change the word 'Reprinted from' to 'Adapted from' to show that you have changed the original (even in a small way). 


 

Reproduction note: 

The figure above, reprinted from Clinical Procedures for Safer Patient Carehas been reproduced under the Creative Commons License. This notice is separate from the figure so as not to confuse the referencing in the figure caption.

Clinical Procedures for Safer Patient Care by Glynda Rees Doyle and Jodie Anita McCutcheon: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

Citing Maps 

 

  • Maps taken from other sources as illustrations require captions and credit lines. See details under the Figures taken from other sources via the Figures tab above. 

Information about maps can usually be presented in the text rather than in a reference list, e.g. the Google Earth satellite view of Newcastle accessed in 2018 shows... 

If a reference list entry is needed, list the cartographer (if known) and the title of the map (in italics) or a description, followed by the scale and size (if known) and publication details or location of the map. Undated maps consulted online should include an access or revision date.

The following is the general format and examples of citing a map from a book, a Google map, and an online historical map

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (Cartographer's Last Name Year of Publication) ...

... (Champlain [1612] 2007, fig.51.3) ...

... (US Geological Survey [1909] 1951) ...

 

Reference list entry: format and example

Cartographer's Last Name, First Name. Year of Map. Map Title: Subtitle. scale and size. Publication Details. Location of Map. URL.

Champlain, Samuel de, cartographer. (1612) 2007. Carte geographique de la Nouvelle Franse. 43 × 76 cm. In The History of Cartography, vol. 3, Cartography in the European Renaissance. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Satellite view of Newcastle. Google Earth. accessed July 30, 2018. https://www.google.com/maps/@-32.9546526,151.6396797,36081m/data=!3m1!1e3! 

US Geological Survey. (1909) 1951(reprint). California: Yosemite Quadrangle. 30-minute series quadrangle, 1:125,000 scale. National Map, Historic Topographic Map Collection. https://www.usgs.gov/media/images/scan-1909-usgs-quadrangle-yosemite-california-area-include-el-capitan-usgs-historic.

Art works

 

Information about paintings, photographs, lithographssculptures, or other works of art can usually be presented in the text rather than in a reference list. If a reference list entry is needed, list the artist, a title (in italics), and a date of creation or completion, followed by information about the medium and the location of the work. For works consulted online, add a URL. 

An exhibition catalog or brochure is often published as a book and is treated as such. 

Artworks taken from other sources as illustrations require captions and credit linesSee details under the Figures taken from other sources via the Figures - citing or reprinting tab above.

The following is the general format of a reference to an art work. 

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (Artist's Last Name Year of Publication) ...

... (Picasso 1942) ...

... (Dalí 1931) ...

 

Reference list entry: format and example

Artist's Last Names, First Name. Year. Title. Medium and other information. Location of work. URL. 

Dalí, Salvador. 1931. The Persistence of Memory. Oil on canvas, 9½ × 13″ (24.1 × 33 cm). Museum of Modern Art, New York. http://www.moma.org/collection/works/79018.

Picasso, Pablo. 1942. Bull’s Head. Bicycle saddle and handlebars, 33.5 × 43.5 × 19 cm. Musée Picasso Paris.

 

Citing Tables 

 

When citing (not reprinting) a table from a book, an article or other sources, provide the page number where the table is located in text citation, preceding the table number, with a comma between them.  

The following is the general format of a reference to a table in a book. For tables from other sources, follow the pattern for that source and add the page and table number in in the text citation as required. If the source is available online, add the DOI or URL to the end of citation in the reference list.

 

In-text citation: format and example

... (Author's Last Name/s Year of Publication, page number, table number) ...

... (Chavas, Hummels, and Wright 2014, 167, table 4.4) ...

 

Reference list entry: format and example (i.e. cite the source normally)

First Author's Last Names, First Name, Other Author's First and Last Names. Year. Book Title: Subtitle. edition. Place of Publication: Publisher.

Chavas, Jean-Paul, David Hummels, and Brian D. Wright, eds. 2014. The Economics of Food Price Volatility. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

 

 

Tables taken from other sources

 

If you are including a table from another source within an assignment, you need provide the source notes and credit lines with the table. If the work being credited is listed in the reference list, only a shortened form needs appear in the credit line.

  • Copy the table exactly as found in the original source, unless you need to adapt it (see info below).
  • The table number, title and description go above the table.
  • Acknowledge the original source within a source note included directly underneath the table.
  • Begin with the word 'Source: ' or Sources:', in italics, followed by a colon, then followed by:
    • 'Reprinted from' if you copy the table exactly as found in the original source; or
    • 'Adapted from' if you have adapted or changed the table; or
    • 'Data from' if you have used the data from another source in your own table.
  • If you are WRITING FOR PUBLICATION (for a journal, conference paper, thesis, website, etc) you must obtain written permission from the copyright owner to reuse the table in your work, and state the permission in the source note as: Source: Reprinted with permission from ...
  • In addition to author, title, publication details, and copyright date by copyright holder, the credit line should include any page or table number.
  • Copyright holder may be the publisher or the author/s
  • While students don't usually require publisher permission to include tables in assignments, you should still include the copyright statement.

 

The following is an example of reprinting a table from a book. For reusing tables from other sources, follow the citation pattern for that source

 

Table 1. Nursing Interventions for the Stages of Dying

Source: Reprinted from Susan E. Lowey, Nursing Care at the End of Life (Geneseo, NY: Open SUNY Textbooks, 2015), table 3.1, http://pressbooks.opensuny.org/nursingcare. Copyright 2015 by Susan E. Lowey (Creative Commons).

 

 

Reproduction note: 

The table above, reprinted from Nursing Care at the End of Life has been reproduced under the Creative Commons License. This notice is separate from the table so as not to confuse the referencing in the table notes.

Nursing Care at the End of Life by Susan. E. Lowey: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

Using figures and tables from other sources when writing for publication

 

If you are including a figure or table you found in another source, and you are WRITING FOR PUBLICATION (for a journal, conference paper, thesis, website, etc) you must:

  • Obtain written permission from the copyright owner to include the figure or table in your work
  • Copy the figure or table exactly as found in the original source, unless you need to adapt it
  • Acknowledge the original source within the figure caption or table note as 'Reprinted with permission from...'
  • This is the case even if you change or adapt something in the figure or table, use 'Adapted with permission from' if applicable. 
  • If the work being credited is listed in the reference list, only a shortened form needs appear in the credit line.

 

Figure example taken from a journal article:

An example is shown below using the template for a figure from a journal article. The pattern follows the style of caption for your image source, plus a notice of permission, the source citation, and the copyright statement. 

For figures from other sources, follow the pattern for the source and add the required notice of permission and copyright statement.

Note that If the work being credited is included in the reference list, only a shortened form needs appear in the credit line.


Image

Figure 1. The clinical reasoning process with descriptors.  Reprinted with permission from Tracy Levett-Jones, et al.,“The Five Rights of Clinical Reasoning: An Educational Model to Enhance Nursing Students' Ability to Identify and Manage Clinically 'At Risk' Patients,” Nurse Education Today 30, no. 6 (August 2010): 158. Copyright 2010 by Elsevier. 

 

Table example taken from a journal article:

An example is shown below using the template for a table from a journal article. The pattern follows the style of note for your image source, plus a notice of permission after the copyright statement: "Copyright 2010 by Elsevier. Reprinted with permission.".

For tables from other sources, follow the pattern for that source and add the required notice of permission and copyright statement.

Note that if the work being credited is included in the reference list, only a shortened form needs appear in the credit line.

 

Table 1. The Difference Between Cue Collection in Experienced and Novice Nurses

Table
Source: Reprinted with permission from Tracy Levett-Jones, et al., “The Five Rights of Clinical Reasoning: An Educational Model to Enhance Nursing Students' Ability to Identify and Manage Clinically 'At Risk' Patients,” Nurse Education Today 30, no. 6 (August 2010): 518. Copyright 2010 by Elsevier. 

 


 

Adapting or changing the figure or table?

 In the caption under the figure (or source note under the table) change the wording 'Reprinted with permission from' to 'Adapted with permission from' to show that you have changed the original (even in a small way).

 

 


Reproduction note: 

The figure and table above, reprinted from Nurse Education Today, have been reproduced with permission. This notice is separate from the figure and table so as not to confuse the referencing in the figure caption and table note.

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