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University of Newcastle Library guides

Vancouver Referencing Style:  Book chapters

UON Library guide to Vancouver Style for UON students

General Rules and Examples

Book chapters

 

General rules:

Book chapters from an edited book (a book has an overall editor/s and the individual chapters are written by various authors) are cited by the chapter author, chapter title, followed by the word "In:" and information about the entire book, and then the page range of the chapter, eg.

Phillips SJ, Whisnant JP. Hypertension and stroke. In: Laragh JH, Brenner BM, editors. Hypertension: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management. 2nd ed. New York: Raven Press; 1995. p. 465-78.


Book chapters from an authored book (the author of the book is the author for all chapters) can be cited by the book followed by the chapter information, such as chapter no, chapter title, and page range, eg. 

Riffenburgh RH. Statistics in medicine. 2nd ed. Amsterdam: Elsevier; c2006. Chapter 24, Regression and correlation methods; p. 447-86.

 

Chapter Author Names

  • List names in the order they appear on the publication
  • Initials follow the surname of authors, no spaces or full-stops appear between initials, eg. Smith CK
  • Capitalise surnames and enter spaces as they appear on the publication. For example, Van Den Hoffer or van der Hoffer
  • Where there are 6 or fewer authors, list all author names.
  • Where there are 7 or more authors, list the first six authors followed by “et al.”
  • Place a comma and space between each name.
  • Do not use “and” or “&” to separate any authors.

Chapter Titles

  • Capitalise only the first word of the chapter title (and words that normally begin with a capital letter).
  • Use a colon followed by a space to separate a title from a subtitle, unless some other form of punctuation (such as a question mark, etc.) is already present.
  • End a title with a period unless a question mark or exclamation point already ends it.
  • Do not italicize, underline or use quotation marks for chapter titles.

Editor Names

  • Use the editor's surname and initials, eg. Smith CK
  • Precede the editor's name with 'In', and follow the editor's name/s with editor/s. 

Book Titles

  • Capitalise only the first word of the book title (and words that normally begin with a capital letter).
  • Use a colon followed by a space to separate a title from a subtitle, unless some other form of punctuation (such as a question mark, etc.) is already present.
  • End a title with a period unless a question mark or exclamation point already ends it.
  • Do not italicize, underline or use quotation marks for book titles.

Edition

  • The edition other than the first is cited. The standard first edition is not cited. 
  • Terms of edition are abbreviated, e.g. 2nd ed. (Second Edition), rev. ed. (Revised Edition), or 1st Aust. ed. (First Australian Edition).
  • Remove any superscript from editions when typing - all letters should be on the same line (e.g. 2nd ed.).

Place of Publication

  • The place of publication appears after the title (and edition if included) and is followed by a colon. 
  • If the place of publication is not well known, include a state or country abbreviation.
  • If more than one place of publication is found, use the first one. Do not give multiple places.
  • If no place of publication can be found or inferred, use [place unknown].

Publisher

  • The publisher’s name may be given either in full or in an abbreviated form.
  • Omit an initial The from a publisher’s name
  • List only the first publisher when there are multiple publishers. 

Year of Publication 

  • For books and book chapters, only the year, not the month or day, is included in the publication date.
  • When the publication date is unknown, use [date unknown].

Page Numbers

  • Include the page range for the chapter preceded by ‘p.’
  • Limit the number of digits in the 2nd part of the page range to those needed for clarity, eg. use p. 351-7 (not p. 351-357).

eBooks Chapter

  • Chapters in eBooks may have their own individual DOI so where possible use the chapter DOI rather than the one for the whole book.
  • For books consulted online, include the DOI if available or the URL at the end of the citation.

Secondary Sources

For citations taken from secondary sources, see the Secondary Sources page

Book chapters with 1-6 author/s

 

The following is the general format of a reference to a book chapter with 1-6 author/s from an edited book. 

  • Where there are 6 or fewer authors, list all author names in the reference.
  • Limit the number of digits in the 2nd part of the page range to those needed for clarity, eg. use p. 351-7 (not p. 351-357).

See the general rules for book chapters for more details. 

 

Reference list entry: format and example

 

Citation No. 1-6 Chapter Author's Last Name Initials. Chapter title: subtitle. In: Editor's Last Name, Initials, editors. Book title: subtitle. Edition. Place of Publication: Publisher; Year of publication. p. page range.

 

1.           Phillips SJ, Whisnant JP. Hypertension and stroke. In: Laragh JH, Brenner BM, editors. Hypertension: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management. 2nd ed. New York: Raven Press; 1995. p. 465-78.

 

Book chapters with 7 or more authors

 

The following is the general format of a reference to a book chapter with 7 or more author/s from an edited book. 

  • Where there are 7 or more authors, list the first six authors followed by “et al.”
  • Limit the number of digits in the 2nd part of the page range to those needed for clarity, eg. use p. 351-7 (not p. 351-357).

See the general rules for book chapters for more details. 

 

Reference list entry: format and example

 

Citation No. 1-6 Chapter Author's Last Name Initials, et al. Chapter title: subtitle. In: Editor's Last Name, Initials, editors. Book title: subtitle. Edition. Place of Publication: Publisher; Year of publication. p. page range.

 

1.           Pryor JA, Prasad SA, Bethune D, Chatwin M, Enright S, Osman LP, et al. Physiotherapy techniques. In: Pryor JA,Prasad SA, editors. Physiotherapy for respiratory and cardiac problems: adults and paediatrics. 4th ed. Edinburgh, UK: Churchill Livingstone; 2008. p. 134-217. 

eBook chapters with a DOI

 

eBook chapters follow the same formatting patterns as those of physical book chapters, but add [Internet] after the book title, the [cited date] after the date of publication, and the DOI to the end of the citation.

The following is the general format of a reference to an ebook chapter from an edited book. 

See the general rules for book chapters for more details. 

 

Reference list entry: format and example

 

Citation No. Chapter Author's Last Name Initials. Chapter title: subtitle. In: Editor's Last Name, Initials, editor/s. Book title: subtitle [Internet]. Edition. Place of Publication: Publisher; Year of publication [cited year Month Day]p. page range. DOI.

 

1.           Moorhead J, Cooper C, Moorehead P. Personality type and patient education in hand therapy. In: Cooper C, editor. Fundamentals of hand therapy: clinical reasoning and treatment guidelines for common diagnoses of the upper extremity [Internet]. 2nd ed. St. Louis, MO: Mosby; 2014 [cited 2019 Jul 21]. p. 183-8. doi:10.1016/B978-0-323-09104-6.00017-1.

 

General guidelines:

  • Some ebooks do not include page numbers - in these cases, use the chapter number instead.
  • Chapters in ebooks may have their own individual DOI so where possible use the chapter DOI rather than the one for the whole book.
  • Include a full-stop after the DOI at the end of the reference.

eBook chapters without DOI

 

eBook chapters without DOI follow the same formatting patterns as those of physical book chapters, but add [Internet] after the book title, the [cited date] after the date of publication, and the URL to the end of the citation.

The following is the general format of a reference to an eBook chapter from an edited book without a DOI. 

See the general rules for book chapters for more details. 

 

Reference list entry: format and example

 

Citation No. Chapter Author's Last Name Initials. Chapter title: subtitle. In: Editor's Last Name, Initials, editor/s. Book title: subtitle [Internet]. Edition. Place of Publication: Publisher; Year of publication [cited year Month Day]p. page range. Available from: URL

 

1.           van Zyl G. Laboratory findings. In: Kamps BS, Hoffmann C, Preiser W, editors. Influenza report 2006 [Internet]. [Paris]: Flying Publisher; c2006 [cited 2006 Nov 20]. [about 12 p.]. Available from: http://www.influenzareport.com/ir/lab.htm

 

General guidelines:

  • Some ebooks do not include page numbers - in these cases, use the chapter number instead or any info for pages.
  • Do not insert a hyphen if you need to break a URL across lines. Break the URL before a slash or dash or at another logical division point.
  • Do not include a full-stop after the URL at the end of the reference.

 

Entries/chapters from reference works

 

Be sure to check with your lecturer if these kinds of resources are suitable for use in your assignments.

 

General notes:

  • Reference works include dictionaries, encyclopaedias, thesauri, handbooks, indexes, etc.
  • It is often sufficient simply to describe the reference content in the text, unless there is a need for a reference list entry.
  • If the book is located online, add [Internet] after the book title, include the date cited, and DOI if available or URL. 
  • Information here is for citing entries with individual author/s different from the book author/s.
  • For entries without author/s or the author of the book is the author for all entries, cite the book followed by the entry title, and page range, eg. 

1.           Stedman's medical dictionary. 28th ed. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins; 2006. Apraxia; p. 119-20.

2.           Martin EA, editor. Concise medical dictionary [Internet]. 9th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press; 2015. Pregestational diabetes [cited 2016 July 17]. Available from: Oxford Reference Online.

The following is the general format of a reference to an entry from a reference book with individual author/s. 

See the general rules for book chapters for more details. 

 

Reference list entry: format and example

 

Citation No. Entry Author. Entry title: subtitle. In: Editor's Last Name, Initials, editor/s. Book title: subtitle [Internet]. Edition. Place of Publication: Publisher; Year of publication [cited Year Month Day]p. page range. DOI / URL

 

1.           Robinson A, Fridovich-Keil JL, Fridovich I. The principles of genetics and heredity. In: The new encyclopaedia Britannica. 15th ed. Vol. 19. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Brittanica, Inc.; c2002. p. 699-740.

2.           Middleton R. Lennon, John Ono (1940–1980). In: Oxford dictionary of national biography [Internet]. online ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press; 2017 [cited 2019 Jul 22]. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/31351.

'Research Starters' from the Library Catalogue

 

Be sure to check with your lecturer if these kinds of resources are suitable for use in your assignments.

 

Short 'articles' called 'Research Starters' can often be found in the Library catalogue (NewCat+) when searching for certain topics. These are usually taken from sources such as encyclopaedias or other reference works. Therefore, their citation would follow the same pattern as entries from online reference works.

The following is the general format of a reference to a Research Starter entry. 

See the general rules for book chapters for more details. 

 

Reference list entry: format and example

 

Citation No.  Entry Author's Last Name Initials. Entry title: subtitle. In: Editor's Last Name, Initials, editor/s. Book title: subtitle [Internet]. Edition. Place of Publication: Publisher; Year of publication [cited year Month Day]p. page range. DOI / Available from: URL

 

1.           Vallente RU. Clinical reasoning. In: Salem Press Encyclopedia of Health [Internet].​ [place unknown]: Salem Press; 2016 [cited 2019 July 22]. [about 1 p.]. Available from: http://eds.b.ebscohost.com 

 

The search results screen for the example used above is shown below:

 

The source for the information will be included in the resource:

 

For this example, the publisher is Salem Press. Place of publication is unknown. 

Course Readers and Compiled Texts ('Custom Book Editions')

 

Course readers and compiled texts are usually collections of chapters and articles specifically chosen as readings for a particular subject.

To reference from these publications see the notes on the Course Material page.

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