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Common feedback comments and what they mean: Run-on sentences

This guide lists some common feedback comments and explains what they mean.

Run on sentences

Run on sentences

A run-on sentence is two or more complete sentences incorrectly written as one.

Let’s look at the following example:
Local governments remain the smallest and poorest tier of government in Australia, their circumstances are worsening.

Notice there are two ideas in this text:
1.    Local governments remain the smallest and poorest tier of government in Australia.
2.    Local governments’ financial circumstances are getting worse.


There is nothing wrong with putting two ideas into a sentence, but you must make the reader aware that you have included two ideas. To do this correctly, join the two ideas together.

1. Use a conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so). Always put a coma just before the conjunction.
 Local governments remain the smallest and poorest tier of government in Australia, and their circumstances are worsening.

2.  Use a semi-colon (;)
Local governments remain the smallest and poorest tier of government in Australia; their circumstances are worsening.

3. Write the ideas in two separate sentences.
Local governments remain the smallest and poorest tier of government in Australia. Their financial circumstances are getting worse.

 

 

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